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Ventilators at lowest cost, $33 each: Dynamatic

Chennai: "Bengaluru-based Dynamatic Technologies has built what it claims is the world's most affordable ventilator that doesn't use electricity.They don't use electricity and are driven by an oxygen cylinder. We sell them for $33 each and it keeps you fully alive," Udayant Malhoutra, CEO and Managing Director of Dynamatic Technologies at a webinar organised by the Synergia Foundation. "The crisis is teaching us stuff everyday."Dynamatics, which builds aerospace systems for Boeing and Airbus, was able to pivot a part of its research teams during the lockdown nto developing what is now the world's lowest cost ventilator, he said.He said around 25,000-30,000 of these low cost ventilators could be produced by the company per month. Malhoutra said rom March onwards, the company tested all its employees and has conducted over 10,000 tests so far, the highest by any organisation in India, he said. Udayant said that the company was driven by risk because it was the sole supplier to Airbus and Boeing and had to rise to the occasion as these industries were considered an essential and critical infrastructure service in Western countries. He said that the company was fortunate to be located in South India where the governments of Tamil Nadu and Karnataka were "responsive" towards their requests and permitted them to operate within five days of the lockdown being announced in March. He stressed that the company had prepaid all their banking and financial commitments till January next year preempting that "something bad" was going to happen. In order to deal with disruptions, it is important to be resilient and find ways to ensure minimal efficiency loss, all the panelists concurred. Deputy director of CTL–MIT, Jim Rice said Covid-19 is distinct from other disruptions as there has been a loss of capacbiltiies and capcities more than any other disruption we have witnessed so far. "There has been a major loss of transportation, internal operations, financial resources and loss of ability to distribute," he said. However, he added that the while the distribution capabilities have been recreated with online e-commerce companies that have emerged quite strongly but it took a long time, he said. Prof Janat Shah, Former head of Supply Chain at IIM Bangalore and the Director of IIM Udaipur said that not all disruptions are alike and even within those situations, even within the same industries, different organisations get affected differently. He emphasised that one can never prevent disruption but how fast an organisation will rebound is dependent on how they react to disruption and how resilient the company is. "There are ways to build organisations that are resilient and with minimum efficiency loss," Professor Shah said.Kishore Jayaraman, President India and South Asia for Rolls - Royce called Covid-19 a "wake up call" and a pandemic of unprecedented proportions. "We have figured out a new normal," he said. "We are here to position ourselves more in India because we have to grow from capacities to capabilities."RS Subramanian, Managing Director of DHL Express said it was important to learn from every disruption. He further emphasized that the company has been running through the pandemic as it said that as long as their customers were operating, they would too. He added that standardisation, process discipline and diligence is what brings in resilience. The Foundation also partnered with the Bombay Chamber of Commerce to reach out to the Industry to discuss the response to disruptions and how the COVID-19 pandemic compares to other significant disruptions.