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Epstein-Barr virus rewires host epigenomes to drive stomach cancer

Epstein-Barr virus rewires host epigenomes to drive stomach cancer
The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), one of the most common human viruses, is associated with about 8 to 10% of stomach—or gastric—cancers, the third leading cause of cancer death globally. Researchers from Chiba University in Japan, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)'s Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) have revealed a novel paradigm in EBV-associated gastric cancer, whereby the EBV viral genome directly alters the host epigenetic landscape to promote the activation of proto-oncogenes (genes involved in normal cell growth that can mutate into cancer-causing genes) and tumorigenesis.