After chronic stress in adolescence, male and female reactions to trauma differ later in life

After chronic stress in adolescence, male and female reactions to trauma differ later in life
Eighteen months ago, eight female researchers in the lab of Gretchen Neigh, Ph.D., at Virginia Commonwealth University began studying how early life experiences and exposure to chronic stress can have lingering effects into adulthood. They discovered that stressors occurring early in life, such as violence or child abuse, may "shape your brain in ways you don't expect," said lead author Gladys Shaw, a Ph.D. candidate in the Biomedical Sciences Doctoral Portal.