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Prince Andrew interview is a PR nightmare and a national joke

In 2006, Prince Andrew invited Jeffrey Epstein to the 18th birthday party of his daughter Beatrice. Andrew didn't know, he claims, that an arrest warrant had been issued for Epstein earlier that year for sexual assault of a minor -- because Epstein had never mentioned it to him. (Even though the British royal family have numerous staff who vet guests.)

Hong Kong campus siege almost over, but the violence and anger is here to stay

• China just hinted it may upend Hong Kong's legal system over the mask ban

Everything you need to know about the first UK election debate

The first game-changing moment of the 2019 UK general election could come on Tuesday evening, as millions of Brits tune into the first televised debate of the campaign.

Rebels seize Saudi Arabian ship in Red Sea

A Saudi Arabian tugboat was seized by Yemen's Iranian-backed Houthi rebels on Sunday, according to the state-run Saudi Press Agency SPA.

Rising floods in Venice threaten the city's architecture

CNN's Scott McLean reports from Venice, Italy, where rising water is raising concern for the city's architecture and threatening some of the its artisan workshops.

China's shoppers are still going strong

With China's economy slowing, many market and economic experts believe that the United States has more leverage to negotiate favorable terms to end the trade war.

Alibaba finds strong demand for its Hong Kong shares despite turmoil

Investors are falling over themselves to buy into Alibaba's debut on the Hong Kong stock market.

The US economy is losing billions of dollars because foreign students aren't enrolling

Fewer international students are coming to the United States. That's hurting American universities and the economy.

The new Motorola Razr is $1,500 but OMG I must have it

No one needs a flip phone in 2019, because no one makes calls anymore. The camera isn't great. The battery life stinks. The screen is plastic. The processor is slow. It's superdupercrazy expensive (think an iPhone 11, then double that). But ... I kinda want the new Motorola Razr.

US cities are losing 36 million trees a year. Here's why it matters

If you're looking for a reason to care about tree loss, the nation's latest heat wave might be it. Trees can lower summer daytime temperatures by as much as 10 degrees Fahrenheit, according to a recent study.

How rich people could help save the planet from the climate crisis

Rich people don't just have bigger bank balances and more lavish lifestyles than the rest of us -- they also have bigger carbon footprints.

What these rare 19th-century photos reveal

Even in its grainy, black-and-white nascence nearly 200 years ago, it was clear that photography would be a game-changing invention.

The hotel built 32 years ago (but never opened)

In 1987, ground was broken on a grand new hotel in North Korea's capital, Pyongyang. The pyramid-shaped, supertall skyscraper was to exceed 1,000 feet in height, and was designed to house at least 3,000 rooms, as well as five revolving restaurants with panoramic views.

The one item of clothing in every genius' closet

When the disgraced health entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes was indicted on fraud charges for her lab-testing company Theranos last year, much of the media discussion rested not on her alleged corporate recklessness and staggering abuses of trust, but on her sartorial choices: black jackets, black slacks, and -- most importantly -- black turtlenecks.

Portraits shine light on Tahiti's 'third gender'

On the Polynesian island of Tahiti, there is said to be something akin to a sixth sense -- one that belongs to neither men nor women. Instead, it is the sole domain of the "mahu," a community recognized as being outside the traditional male-female divide.

Rare color photos cast new light on WWII

Color film was rare in World War II. The vast majority of the photos taken during the conflict were in black and white, and color photography as a whole was still a relatively new technique.

How the 1% are preparing for the apocalypse

Say "doomsday bunker" and most people would imagine a concrete room filled with cots and canned goods.

Europe's most beautiful winter city

Budapest is fast becoming one of Europe's leading travel destinations, especially in winter when Hungary's capital city truly comes to life.

What we learned from the world's longest flight

It feels like the world just got that bit smaller. A flight operated by Australian airline Qantas has just made the record-breaking trip from London to Sydney nonstop, spending 19 hours and 19 minutes in the air and opening up the possibility of scheduled direct flights between some of the farthest corners of the planet.

The world's most beautiful places

The world's a spectacular place, full of hidden and overt beauty in every corner. But beauty's also subjective. It'd be impossible to get a unanimous decision on the most beautiful places around the world, but we believe this list is a good start to plan your travels.

This fire has burned for 4,000 years

"This fire has burned 4,000 years and never stopped," says Aliyeva Rahila. "Even the rain coming here, snow, wind -- it never stops burning."

Secrets of the world's grandest place of worship

It's Abu Dhabi's star attraction, attracting millions each year, yet despite the footfall, there's a wonderful air of calm that surrounds the majestic Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque.

Video captures transit worker saving man moments before oncoming train

A California rapid transit employee is being hailed as a hero for rescuing a man who fell onto the tracks as a train was approaching the platform.

A college student worked at a Texas hotel for 32 hours alone during a flood. Guests say he's a hero

When Satchel Smith's father dropped him off for his shift at Homewood Suites in Beaumont, Texas, he expected the day to be like any other: He'd start at 3 p.m. and leave around 11 p.m. that night.

Neighbors complete three weeks' worth of harvesting in a day for farmer diagnosed with cancer

When stage 4 cancer stood in the way of farmer Larry Yockey reaping his wheat harvest for the first time in 50 years, dozens of his fellow farmers stepped up to save his crop.

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